Monday Travel Memory: Dutch Countryside

Happy Monday, kids. Is Monday ever really happy though? It’s not a happy one for me. I’m sick. Again. Just got back from California on Saturday (can’t wait to share that trip with you!), and felt like I was log-rolling into another cold yesterday and it was confirmed this morning.

So. While watching terrible day time tv in bed, I was going through the few photos I have on this computer and came across these beauties. Jaro took them when he was on a boat ride with co-workers and you can clearly tell the higher quality of these photos with our fancy lens. I usually avoid hauling it around (it is extremely heavy), but after looking at these pics, I think I have to.

Doesn’t the Dutch countryside look so peaceful?

Dutch Countryside Dutch Countryside

Dutch Countryside Makes me miss living in Holland. If I ever move back, I want to live in that house.

xxx

 

 

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A Visitor’s Guide to Amsterdam

Sometimes when visiting a new city, people like getting advice from a local. Not from TripAdvisor or Lonely Planet or even the New York Times, like everyone else. A local. That’s a badge I now wear with honor in Amsterdam. I’ve been asked many times to provide tips for visitors and I’m really happy to do so. Having lived in Amsterdam for fourteen months and hosting dozens of guests, we have done and seen a LOT. Rather than continue sending individual emails, I thought it would be smart to make one giant list, so going forward, I can just send someone this link. It was impossible to cut this down; there are so many things we love about this city. I did my best to explain everything and hopefully this will be useful to someone! So here we go, my massive list of suggestions on what to do, see, eat and drink.

Sights There is a lot to do in Amsterdam despite its small size. This mighty mini-city packs a punch. These are my top picks and how long you need:

  • Van Gogh Museum A sizable collection of this artist’s works, curated by his family. Doesn’t have several of his masterpieces, like Starry Night, but it does have others you’ll recognize such as The Bedroom and Sunflowers. Ton of other stuff like works of artists that influenced him, etc. 2 hours
  • Anne Frank Huis While a sobering experience, it’s something worth seeing. Read or re-read the book before the visit, it makes a much bigger impact when her story is fresh in your head. Buy ahead, the queue can easily be over an hour alone. 1 hour
  • Stedelijk Museum Newly reopened modern art museum. The building itself is an interesting hybrid of old and new architecture. 2-3 hours
  • Olde Kerk & Tower Oldest surviving building in Amsterdam, dates back to 1300-ish. Climb the tower (extra fee) for really nice city views. 1 hour
  • Canal Bus Tour I have done this three times with different guests. We like to bring beer on it and, rather than constantly hopping off, we sit there for the whole loop and then switch to the next route. Ticket is good for the entire day though. Half a day
  • Bike Rental This is the best way to see the city. While I haven’t rented a bike myself, I know having one allows you to get around quickly. (See my pros and cons on the subject) All day
  • Heineken Experience When we went, I thought it was lame. I was so not into being a tourist; I mean I live here. But maybe it is a good rainy afternoon diversion for a beer-loving tourist. It’s not exactly cheap (I think €17 a person), but a teeny beer during the tour and two beers in the bar at the end are included. 3 hours
  • Boat Rental This is the BEST thing to do on a nice, sunny day. Get your own boat, fill it with friends, food and booze and you’ll have the perfect afternoon.
  • Ajax Game Although the stadium is outside the city center, it’s worth the short metro ride if you are in town for a game day. The Dutch take football very seriously and going to a game is a unique way to experience the culture.

Markets Market culture is huge in Amsterdam and an essential experience as a visitor. From souvenirs to antiques to food to household supplies, the markets have it all.

  • De Pijp: Albert Cuyp Markt This is the market in my neighborhood so I know it best. It’s also the most famous and if you take the tram to it, you’ll hear “Albert Cuyp Market, Amsterdam Famous Street Market” over the intercom. It’s also the most diverse and some of the home furnishing stores along the way are worth peeking in. When we first moved here, we “ate our way” through the market (more than once), stopping for cheese, waffles, stroopwaffel, loempia, frites and more.
  • Jordaan: Noordermarkt (Saturdays only) We love this one. There are a ton of food stalls; you can pick up fresh pasta and organic olive oil for dinner. There’s also produce, meat, cheese, oysters (which I showed you here) and bread galore. Tons of non-edibles too. Like pretty, pretty flower bouquets.
  • Jordaan: Lindengrachtmarkt (Saturdays only) This is a long, narrow market around the corner from Noorderkerk. One of our favorite lunches is the “hot meat” stand (which I gushed about here). We have eaten there probably 15 times. Love it.
  • Old Center: Bloemenmarkt The flower market. Le sigh. Not much else to say about this one, it speaks for itself. It is always jam-packed with tourists. Bonus: The Henri Willig basement cheese shop is very, very generous with the samples. Try the herb gouda with balsamic mustard. Or young gouda with dill mustard. Do it.
  • Old Center: Waterlooplein Markt The junk antique market. You know what they say, one man’s trash is another’s treasure. There is a ton of random old stuff here that is fun to rifle through. You never know…
  • Old Center: Westergasfabriek Markt (first Sunday of the month) We only found out about this one recently, but I wish we had known it sooner! It rarely makes an appearance (once a month), so you have to go; it’s a special one. There are a lot of interesting crafts and pretty jewelry from local artists. Also, there are a ton of food cats in the back with everything from falafel to gyros to cupcakes. It’s great for lunch.

Eats While you’re here, be sure to try the following Dutch snacks: Cheese (!!), raw herring (with pickles and onions), bitterballen (deep-fried meat paste), frites (with mayo, don’t be a wuss), poffertjes (mini-pancakes) and stroopwaffel (waffle sandwich glued together with caramel). Regarding dining: Dutch food itself is rather boring and plain, IMO. It’s a lot of meat and potatoes. It took us awhile to discover the full scope of the dining scene in Amsterdam. Once we did, we realized there is no shortage of excellent restaurants. I can’t narrow this down, sorry. Grouped by neighborhood.

  • De Pijp: Bazar [North African/Turkish] This is our favorite place for both its crazy fun ambiance and good food. We have been here with almost every guest. Favorite dishes include Irfan & Abdul starters, Tavuk Sis (chicken skewers), Adana Yogurtlu (lamb) and the couscous with fish. You can’t go wrong. Portions are enormous so come hungry.
  • De Pijp: De Duvel [International] Our other favorite. I love this cozy spot for the tuna melt at lunch, but dinner is great too. It’s the perfect neighborhood cafe.
  • De Pijp: Spang Makandra [Surinamese] Cheap, delicious and cash only. Try the sampler platters to taste much of the menu on one plate. Have a ginger beer as well. Also, I heard Anthony Bourdain approved.
  • De Pijp: Simpel [International] Modern and like the name implies, simple, food. Really good for a quiet date.
  • De Pijp: White Elephant [Thai] Our favorite Thai place in the city. The combination appetizer is so, so good and I love their Tom Ka Kai.
  • De Pijp: Suvi [Sushi/Vietnamese] My go-to sushi place. I ordered from here about once a week. It’s really fresh.
  • De Pijp: Mamouche [North African/French] Pricier, but worth it. Love the mirrored walls and candlelight. Great date night.
  • De Pijp: Taj Mahal [Indian] It looks like a cheap take out place from the street, but give it a chance. This place lacks in charisma, but the food is really good. I love the presentation; everything comes in little silver pots with candles to keep it warm.
  • De Pijp: The Butcher [Burgers] Closest thing to American burgers we have tried. And they are good. Really good. My fave is the truffle burger cause I’m fancy like that.
  • Canal Belt South: Pata Negra [Spanish] Our favorite tapas place in the city. Want to feel like you are really in Spain? Cram yourself into this dark, loud, graffiti-ed hole in the wall and you will. Sangria goes down a little too easy.
  • Canal Belt South: Tempo Doeloe [Indonesian] Very pricey, so watch yourself. This bill adds up quick if you let the server order for you. Food was incredibly delicious. Interior is a bit dated, but still worth a visit.
  • Canal Belt South: Pont Acari [Italian] Scenic spot on a quiet, pretty canal. I believe the owner and staff are really Italian, so they get it.
  • Canal Belt South: Lion Noir [International] Fancy food just south of old center, one street over from the Bloemenmarkt. Trendy, posh decor and delicious food. Not sure if the menu rotates, but try the Earl Grey ice cream dessert. Heavenly.
  • Jordaan: Balthazar’s Keuken [International] Another all-around favorite. Limiting your choices to either meat or fish, a €30 prix fixe gets you a 3-course, amazing meal. The best food in the city, IMO. House wine is surprisingly good too.
  • Jordaan: Mazzo [Italian] Great sandwiches and pizzas, but pass on the soggy pastas. We like it for lunch. Good place for a morning coffee or afternoon beer too.
  • Jordaan: Cafe Winkel [Dessert] Go here for the apple tart. Wait in the enormous queue that wraps around the block. I’m telling you right now: It’s worth it.
  • Canal Belt West: Envy [International] Best oysters I’ve had in Amsterdam. Small plate menu is inventive and the decor is swanky.
  • Canal Belt West: De Belhamel [French] If you want to impress someone, you go here. It’s the epitome of Amsterdam romance, as it sits on the intersection of two very pretty canals. Food is lick-your-plate delicious, but don’t do that. This place is classy.
  • Old Center: Cafe de Jaren [International] An easy, classic choice. The bright, airy cafe is great to have beers with friends as we’ve often done, or full meals like spaghetti and meatballs and game pie. I like the waterfront patio in back.
  • Old Center: Nevy [Seafood] Another great spot for a date, right on the Ij. Lots of creative fish dishes on the menu and everything is delicious.

Drinks There are pubs on every corner where you can get Dutch & Belgian beers like Heineken or La Chouffe. Flinck, Groene Vlinder and Chocolate Bar, since they were a 2 minute walk from our place. Here are others we found worth the extra time:

  • De Pijp: Cafe de Pijp (Cafe/Bar) Hip, large bar and cafe in our ‘hood. We liked the classic music and mid-century modern interior.
  • De Pijp: Barça (Cafe/Bar) Right on Heinekenplein, this is a great place for a drink in the summer when they have the huge patio seating area. Good sangria and mixed drinks.
  • Canal Belt South: Njoy (Cocktail bar) A narrow two-level cocktail lounge with incredible drinks and loud music. Try the spicy thai chili Blazing Mule or the refreshing Grape Dreamer Collins.
  • Canal Belt South: Suzy Wong (Cocktail bar) Great for a girls night. Or date. Or anything. It’s cool. Mojitos are a dangerous €5 on Wednesdays.
  • Canal Belt South: Bar Moustache (Cafe/Bar) Quirky bar on lively Utrechtsestraat with photographs of people in, you guessed it, all variations of facial hair. Great for drinks or dinner. I love the window seats.
  • Canal Belt West: Vyne (Wine bar) This is a classy wine bar on the beautiful Prinsengracht. I love their wine flights and the sexy decor. Yeah I said it. The sommeliers are friendly and knowledgeable too.
  • Museum Quarter: Momo (Cocktail bar) This is about as pretentious as Amsterdam gets, where many people go to see and be seen. Don’t turn to the dark side and become a stiff, but do go there for the surprisingly good cocktail menu and seriously delish snacks (like crispy duck). It’s also a posh restaurant.
  • Museum Quarter: Tunes (Cocktail bar) I like this lounge for the dark, moody interior and the lengthy cocktail menu, but it does get packed on weekends. It’s inside the newly renovated Conservatorium Hotel.

Shops The shopping here in Amsterdam pales in comparison to cities like London, Paris and Stockholm. But it does have some great shops that are worth seeking out, other than heavy hitters Zara, H&M and Mango. The 9 Straatjes, in whole, are just fun to cruise through to poke into all the little unique boutiques. Here is my short list:

  • De Pijp: Streetclothes (women’s streetwear)
  • De Pijp: Cottoncake (women’s streetwear)
  • De Pijp: Raak (women’s streetwear)
  • Utrechtsestraat: Labels (women’s streetwear) *also in the 9 Straatjes
  • Utrechtsestraat: Bendorff (men’s streetwear) *also in the 9 Straatjes
  • Utrechtsestraat: Rams (home decor)
  • Old Center: Maison de Bonneterie (department store)
  • Old Center: Bijenkorf (department store)
  • 9 Straatjes: Denham (men’s & women’s streetwear)
  • 9 Straatjes: Leifde (loungewear & home decor)
  • Throughout city: Hema (Target-like for you Americans)

And finally some random advice:

  • You do not have to tip in the Netherlands, but servers now expect it from tourists. A few euro is enough, even for a dinner. 10% max for truly great service.
  • Avoid taxis. They are very expensive and the city is too small to warrant them.
  • Watch out for bicyclists.
  • Always carry an umbrella.
  • Don’t freak out when you smell marijuana or see a red light (yes, they exist outside of the district).

There you have it. My top picks for Amsterdam. Please, I urge you, pass this along to travelers headed this way. I hope they find it helpful and enjoy this incredible city as much as we have! One last tip: Make sure to go for an evening stroll along the canals…

If you have other faves, please share with a comment!

xxx

P.S.  Check out my guide for living in Amsterdam.

An Expatriate Guide: Living in Amsterdam

So, you want to live in Amsterdam, huh? Or know someone who does? Maybe I, an American expat living in Amsterdam, can help. Now that my husband and I have lived in here for over a year (and sadly leaving it soon), I think we are ready to give advice to those that are considering it. Long story short: It is an absolutely fantastic city and I highly recommend it. There. Drop whatever you are doing and move! If you need more convincing, some specifics below.

Overall Feel: Amsterdam has a very unique vibe, which is something that clicked with us right away. It really isn’t like anywhere else. There is a charm to it that I can’t explain. It is laid-back and unpretentious. It is not judgmental; there is a very evident “to each his own” attitude. It’s also beautiful and romantic without trying too hard. Actually, it doesn’t try at all. It just is.

Neighborhoods: Each ‘hood in Amsterdam is different. Really you can’t go wrong, the city is so small that you can easily get from one end to the other in 30 minutes by tram or bike. I do have my preferences, however. I like living in what I think are “cool” neighborhoods. And I’d like to remind everyone that this is strictly my opinion; others may see it differently. Here is a very tiny summary:

  • Old Center: I’d say this area is the busiest as it’s home to the Dam Square, Royal Palace, Centraal Station and Red Light District. I tend to avoid it since it is usually very crowded and full of tourists. There are quiet areas & pretty canals though once you move away from the Damrak/Rokin streets. There are a lot of shopping (fast fashion staples like Zara, H&M, Mango, and department stores like Maison de Bonneterie, Bijenkorf) and restaurant choices (we like Cafe de Jaren) in this area.
  • Canal Belt: This area is the most romantic. Amsterdam’s famous canals must be seen to be believed. They are magical, especially at night. Living here is very pricey, I believe. When we were house hunting, we were shown a shoe box that didn’t even have canal views for the same price as our loft. The 9 Straatjes on the west side (Denham, Bendorff and Scotch & Soda, do it) and Utrechtsestraat (Labels, Jan, Bellarose) on the south side are my favorite boutique shopping areas.
  • Jordaan: This area is very residential and beautiful. The narrow streets with leaning townhouses have so much charm. If we hadn’t lived in the Pijp, we would have wanted to live here. It is a very trendy area with great boutique shopping as well and lots of cool little restaurants. My favorite restaurant in Amsterdam, Balthazar’s Keuken, is located here.
  • De Pijp: …Is where it’s at! Okay, so I’m partial to the Pijp because that’s where we live, but I absolutely love it. The Albert Cuyp Market gets it’s fair share of tourists, but the neighborhood is very eclectic and “bohemian.” One could even call it the hipsterville of Amsterdam. There are great boutiques (Cottoncake and Streetclothes are my picks), lots of cool restaurants (De Duvel and Bazar are our faves) and a nice park. While at the south end of the city, it’s well connected to Centraal Station by tram.
  • Museum Quarter: This area is very posh and packed with culture. It’s home to the designer shopping street P.C. Hooftstraat and the beautiful Vondelpark (our very own Central Park). Watch out for tourist groups on bikes pedaling through the park or Museumplein, which is behind the Rijksmuseum, Stedelijk and Van Gogh Museum, all located here as well.
  • Oost/Jewish Quarter: I don’t know much about this area at all. This is where the Waterlooplein flea market and zoo are located. It is otherwise very residential. None of my restaurant or shopping excursions took me this way. There is a lot of new architecture because, sadly, much of it was torn down after WWII. It doesn’t have the same charm as the rest of the city.

People: Almost uncomfortably friendly. As a guarded and even suspicious American, it can be surprising that people are genuinely this nice (of course, not for me since I’m from the Midwest; we invented nice). People say “hallo” to each other in the street and as soon as you give yourself away as an American speak, they want to know everything about your experience living here. What you like about their city and also what you don’t. They want to know what you do and sometimes even how much rent you pay. Don’t be shy! I have found the Dutch to be very forward, yet well-intentioned, so you might as well be too.

Language:  Dutch itself is not exactly a poetic language or particularly easy to learn. I did a 10-week course (Thanks Allard!), starting like 6 months after we moved here. I wish I had done it right away and mastered more. There’s something about addressing people in their own language that is, I don’t know, respectful? It just shows some effort. I mean, you are living in their country. And if that was your choice, you should try to assimilate. Then again, everyone speaks English. Even many of the old folks and young kids. So sometimes it’s hard to keep practicing your Dutch because it’s easier for you (and them, honestly) to just talk in English.

Style: Casual, casual, casual. Even nice restaurants, the theater and the concert hall have relaxed dress codes. Of course some work environments may require suits, but the overall aesthetic is decidedly more laid back. For eclectic street styles, check out Dam Style.

Culture: There is more to Amsterdam than pot and prostitutes (you can see my brief rant about that here). That does exist. Get over it. The rest of the city is simply charming. There are tons of museums, swanky restaurants, hip clubs, cozy pubs, and boutique shopping galore. Think you’re going to find a Gap or Sephora here? Forget it. A lot of big chains don’t have outlets here. (Don’t worry, H&M and Zara do.)

Safety: I rarely feel unsafe in the city. Really, the only time when I do is when I can tell a junkie is staggering in my direction. In all likelihood, it is a tourist that overindulged and really not a threat.

Getting Around: A breeze. Pick yourself up a GVB chipkaart right away and you’ll see how conveniently the city is connected by tram, bus and underground subway. Of those, I prefer the tram. But most of the time, I walk or ride my bike. This is the biking capital of the world, so to truly feel like an Amsterdammer, you gotta hop on two wheels (there are pros and cons to the bike culture).

Weather: This is probably a turn off for most people, but hear me out. Yes, it rains. A lot. And most days are an overcast shade of grey. But you gain a whole new appreciation for nice weather. So really, you win.

Household Basics: Things like establishing residency, personal banking, health insurance, etc. all took way longer than we expected (see my brief rant about customer service) and there were many hiccups that were out of our control. Things that would be unheard of in the U.S. like switching signatures on your bank cards or losing your passport photo and forgetting to tell you). You have to have some patience, there is no need for speed here, despite your sense of urgency. Chill. It will get done. (Just remember to follow up, sometimes they forget to process your immigration…)

Housing: After seeing friends’ apartments, we realize we definitely lucked out. Apartments are typically small and have weird lay outs. I’m realizing that is just common in Europe, because we are seeing much of the same in Stockholm (moving there next week). Since we are short-term, we’re still renting and one huge difference from the States is that we pay every single bill separately. Rent, energy, water, trash removal, property taxes (yep, we paid that for the year!) and cable are all separate. Be sure to clarify what is included in your rent, if anything.

What did I leave out? I’ve previously shared things I’ll miss (times two) and things I won’t miss about living here. And I am compiling a separate post about what to do as a visitor in Amsterdam.

Any questions, please write in the comments!

xxx

Amsterdam: 10 (more) Things I’ll Miss

You can see installment one here

This list will probably make more sense if you visited us this year, or have been faithfully been reading this blog for awhile (love you). I could go on and on…

  1. The hot meat man: 
  2. The hot meat: 
  3. My bike basket looking like this every weekend: 
  4. Lazy mornings with our favorite house guests: 
  5. This apple tart (definitively the best in the world): 
  6. Dutch frites (arguably the best in the world): 
  7. These oysters (sometimes accompanied by champagne, because we’re fancy like that):
  8. This window: 
  9. This hilariously tiny oven that still got the job done: 
  10. Our street: 

xxx

Amsterdam: 5 Things I’ve Learned

After living in Holland for over a year, I’ve learned a lot. These things in particular:

  1. Patience. Customer service? Forget it. Whether it’s inexplicably waiting 6 months for a residency permit or 45 minutes for a prescription pick up at the pharmacy, you better not be in a hurry. Both (and many other similar scenarios) happened to me. The Dutch certainly are not going to speed up their pace to accomodate you, impatient American. Slow your roll. However, Ikea will deliver to your door within 2 hours. Guess that’s a Swedish thing. 
  2. Perseverance. The market doesn’t have all the ingredients for dinner tonight? Head to the grocery store. They don’t have it all either? Go to the other grocery store. Still? Try the more expensive international food store. That process can often be a half day affair. Stick it out. The fantastic black bean burgers that result? Worth it.
  3. Trust. Do not trust the weatherman. Whenever they say it’s not going to rain, it will. Layered dressing and preferably something waterproof is the way to go. Always be prepared. On the other hand, always trust the cheese man. Somehow he always knows exactly what you want (i.e. any of them). 
  4. Bikers have the right of way. Always.
  5. Have fun. Every day. Despite waiting, despite running around for food, despite almost getting run over, despite the weather. Remind yourself that you are fortunate to be living in Holland. Because you are.

xxx

Amsterdam: 5 Things I Won’t Miss

Gasp! There is actually something Julie won’t miss about living in Amsterdam? She’s always singing its praises. 

Guys, let’s keep it real. Life in Amsterdam isn’t always rainbows and sunshine. In fact, depending how you read that, it mostly isn’t. Here are some things that I definitely won’t miss about our brief Dutch life:

  1. The bike culture. But wait, I thought you said it was something you would miss? Well, there are two sides to that story. This other, evil side is the one that whizzes past you, pedaling the wrong direction in the bike lane (or not), but somehow you, pedestrian/motorist/innocent soul, are the moron and you are in the wrong for not seeing them first. I have been clipped by many a biker. And when you aren’t prepared, that bell is startling. Consider this a warning: Bicyclists always have the right of way. That includes when I’m riding, thankyouverymuch.
  2. The ignorant comments from people that never have visited Amsterdam and claim they know it’s all about prostitution and pot. Guess what? It’s not. While the Red Light District and coffeeshops do exist and are a legal boost to our economy, they have nothing to do with my life and it’s easy to forget they are even here.
  3. Actually, I take that back. The tourists that visit such places and then create scenes in otherwise peaceful places (like when I’ve been harassed by junkies in the park… at 11am). We’re just trying to live our life, so keep your dalliances to yourself. I don’t care what you do, just do it somewhere that is not in front of my face.
  4. The weather. I’ve gotten used to it, and I suppose I can make this positive by saying that now I really truly appreciate a nice, sunny day. Most of the time, it’s like this: 
  5. It’s dirty. Coming from Chicago, which I guess is very clean, this is the other end of the spectrum. Trash is left in the streets, the canal water is polluted, and no one ever picks up after their dogs. Unbelievably, it doesn’t smell! Must be all the flowers…

These lists are fun.

xxx

Amsterdam: 10 Things I’ll Miss

As we wrap up our time in Amsterdam, I’ve been reflecting like whoa on everything that I’m going to miss about our Dutch life. While there are countless things that I’ll miss, here is a short list of some more “general” things:

  1. Market shopping. Obviously. This is basically my main pastime. I love strolling through the many markets that are squeezed into tiny Amsterdam. It’s where I get most of our produce, and a lot of our poultry and cheeses. And it’s always fun to check out some of the interesting trinkets being sold. 
  2. There’s no panhandling. I’m told that Amsterdam has a lot of programs and shelters to limit this activity. I have never once been asked for money in the 14 months we have lived here. In a way, that has contributed to the safe environment this city maintains. There is low crime and little to fear as I come home alone at night, which I’ve done often.
  3. The architecture. Charming, quaint, and cute are the first three adjectives that come to mind. Amsterdam is a small city, and the building style, which is highly regulated, helps to keep the small town charm intact. There are rules on what you can do to the facade and how tall you can build.
  4. The bike culture. I occasionally moan and groan about riding my bike, but that is mostly out of laziness. I really love riding it. And with all the bike lanes and signals, not to mention how fast we can get places, it’s a wonderful convenience. 
  5. The parks, specifically Sarphatipark and Vondelpark. For its size, Amsterdam has a healthy amount of green space. We had many picnics, long walks and good ole fashion fun in ’em. 
  6. Those canals. I know we’re moving to a place with lots o’ water, but it’s different. It’s not as intimate. There is something incredibly romantic about a stroll along the Dam canals. 
  7. The abundance of flowers. Hello, we’re in the the tulip capital of the world, despite the fact that they did not originate here. Fun Fact: Tulips are really from Turkey and were imported here in 16th century. We always had fresh flowers in the house this year, which became a daily luxury rather than a once-in-awhile treat. 
  8. The street style here has really changed the way I look at everyday dressing. While the 90’s grunge look is definitely seeing a resurgence, people also just embrace their own unique style, whatever that is. While Dam Style is an homage to the younger, quirkier set, its a glimpse at some of the more eclectic fashion. Many people dress more subtly.
  9. I have definitely taken this for granted, but the centrality of Amsterdam in Europe; its magical ability to be a 1 to 2 hour flight from seemingly everywhere, is something I know I’m going to miss. Stockholm, while a major city, is at least one connection away from a lot of places we may want to visit and often will be a much longer flight.
  10. Raw herring. I don’t care what you say, I like it. Especially on a crunchy bun with onions and pickles. 

Of course, this is not a full list. These were on the very top of my head. 😀

xxx

Final Dam Visitors: This is Living

…Is what Adam said when he arrived at our apartment, popped open a beer and marveled at the view down our little, narrow street.

It truly is. Our last visitors of the year came for a whirlwind week in July. About a month ago. Remember my most recent post about not being busy? Well the day after I wrote it, that all changed and things have been non-stop around here. In a good way.

But I digress. This post is about our visit from Shannon, Adam and Chris, three of my dearest friends all the way back from high school! We go wayyy back. The entire week was constant laughter and fun. I still can’t stop myself from giggling at all the memories. And we did some cool stuff too! Here’s the short list:

Van Gogh Museum. Only my second visit. Just as great as the first.

 

Anne Frank Huis. Again, my second visit. Better than my fist when I was alone. Although you don’t really talk while in there, it’s better to have company.

– Amsterdam Noord & Noorderlicht Cafe. Per Adam’s insistence, we headed to Amsterdam Noord to try out this cafe and see the street art scene up there at NDSM-Werf. Naturally, took the wrong ferry and walked for an hour in pouring rain to get there, but it was worth it:

– Road-tripped to Belgium! We hit up Ghent & Bruges, two places we also visited with M&M when they stayed with us in January. I love Belgium for the beautiful architecture, interesting beers and delicious mussels. We had pots, and pots and pots! Also got to enjoy a free concert in Bruges’ main square on a mild summer night.

– Back in Amsterdam, we went on a boat ride on the sunniest, most pleasant day in Dutch history. Couldn’t think of a better way to end the week.

I even made these delicious rosemary vodka lemonades for the occasion:

Which reminds me… I haven’t shared recipes in awhile and I have been cooking up a STORM, you guys. More on that later.

It was truly an incredible week. So much celebrating. So much fun. Until we brought them to the airport. It’s always sad when our friends and family leave us, but this was a little different. This trio leaving was a very poignant, very sad realization as well – that’s it. No more visitors are scheduled at the moment as we decide what is next for us. Are we staying in Amsterdam? Moving within Europe? Heading stateside? You’ll just have to wait and see!

Coming up: Our anniversary vacation in Italy!

Weekend Wrap Up

Ahoy, Captain. Jaro surprised me with a private boat ride!

Bloemengracht

Enjoying the hot date (and nice weather!).

Modern houseboat

A pretty scene

Ducklings

Nerds (but look, he even brought flowers on board!)

The best way to spend a Saturday afternoon.

The Butcher.

I ask for a picture and get swooped up. Super fans!

Nederland (6) vs. Northern Ireland (0)

Heading to Ukraine today for the European Championship 2012. I can’t believe it’s here and we get to see all Jaro’s hard work pay off. Still figuring out what will happen to us come September. We will be sure to make an announcement when we find out what’s next!!

xxx